Suzi's Blog

Loaded Potato Salad from Lunch by Gale Gand

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The picture shows a red onion because I like red onions. I always put red onions in potato salad. How can it be potato salad without one?

Actually, this recipe from Gale Gand’s new Lunch present us with a very different potato salad, and a delicious one at that. Here there is no red onion, no vinegar, no pickles, no egg. Ah, there are potatoes. And cheddar cheese, and bacon.

The recipe title says “Loaded” and it is. The bacon flavor mates with the cheese and chives to form a really new vibrancy. The dressing, the classic dip mix of mayo and sour cream, is thick, rich and quite completely coats the potatoes. This salad is best served distinctly cold. And, while author Gale Gand says it will hold for four days in the fridge, you need to understand the flavor profile over time. That bacon becomes increasingly dominant. The cleanest, brightest flavors are on day when you pull it quite completely chilled to your table.

I’m not sure why, but an equally cold German white, sweet and filled with sunshine, seems the best mate you could imagine.

 

Loaded Potato Salad

Yield: serves 4 to 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and halved (or quartered, if large)
  • ½ pound bacon, cooked, cooled, and diced
  • ¼ cup sliced scallions
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ½  cup sour cream or plain yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon snipped fresh chives
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Preparation:

Place the potatoes in a large pot with enough water to cover them. Bring the water to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and simmer until the potatoes are fork tender, 15 to 20 minutes. (Don’t overcook them or they could fall apart.) Drain the potatoes in a colander and set aside to cool.

In a medium bowl, combine the bacon, scallions, garlic, cheese, mayonnaise, sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper and fold them with a rubber spatula to combine. When the potatoes have cooled, cut them into 1-inch cubes and add them to the mayonnaise mixture, folding them in gently to coat. Serve immediately, or chill for 2 hours to help the flavors develop before serving. The potato salad keeps in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

Source: Lunch by Gale Gand

Photo Information: Canon T2i, EF-S 60MM Macro Lens, F/2.8, 1/100th second, ISO-2000

 

 

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Ambrosia Fruit Salad for Brunch Dessert

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In Greek mythology, ambrosia was the food of the gods. What better way to conclude a brunch than with an Ambrosia Fruit Salad, filed with fruit, yogurt, coconut, whipping cream, …

And miniature marshmallows. I’m not kidding. It’s listed as an optional ingredient below. We offered this for a family brunch a couple of weeks ago and tactfully left the marshmallows out. The recipe already was feast for man or gods.

Despite the Greek gods reference, ambrosia appears to be an American creation form the early 19th century, probably in the south. It is the coconut that distinguishes ambrosia from a pack of sibling recipes. And no, while people speak in mythology ambrosia no one ever penned the recipe used by the gods.

So, maybe we should have included the marshmallows? Can you picture them sitting on Mount Olympus, around a fire pit, making s’mores. I can’t. It’s just not dignified.

Ambrosia Fruit Salad

Yield: 2 pounds or 16 2” patties

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups cubed fresh pineapple
  • 2 large navel oranges, peeled and sectioned
  • 1 ½ cups green grapes
  • 1 cup miniature marshmallows (optional)
  • 1 large banana, sliced
  • ½ cup flaked coconut
  • ¼ cup chopped almonds
  • ¾ cup (6 ounces) vanilla yogurt
  • ¾ cup heavy whipping cream

Preparation:

In a large serving bowl, combine the first seven ingredients.

Whip the heavy whipping cream and yogurt together until well blended, then gently fold in fruit to yogurt mixture. Chill until serving.

Source: Alton Brown, of course

Photo Credits: Canon T2i, 18-55MM Macro lens, F/5, 1/60th second, ISO-250