Suzi's Blog

Oreo Truffles: Easy, Delicious, Addictive

wc-IMG_6287

 

It’s the weekend. A hot day. You’re tired and it’s still just the afternoon. The kids are demanding dessert for tonight and you have no idea even what dinner will be. Burgers on the grill would seem to be your destiny. But if you fail to supply a balanced meal — including some smashing desserts — the weekend will end with frowns or tears or stomping. And that’s just you. Who knows how the kids will behave.

Here’s a solution. Invoke those children with something like, “You want dessert? You get in the kitchen.”

No, poor strategy. How about, “Kids, you get to help with dessert. Get the Oreos and a hammer.”

Yes, that’s more like it.

I tasted these Oreo Truffles for the first time last week. I was just presented with a chocolate ball. I had no idea what was about to be consumed. I took a bite. I gasped.

“Do you have the recipe,” I asked one of Suzen’s chef’s here at Cooking by the Book. That’s not an easy question. Rian is a famed baker with a portfolio of secret recipes. How would I get the details of this treat. I like Rian. I did not want to have to resort to waterboarding. But I do have my priorities.

He laughed. “It’s on the web. It’s famous. It’s simple.”

How I never knew about this delicacy, I’ll never know. It’s brilliantly simple. It’s decadent. And it really is something that your kids can do. They can do the whole thing with you watching and they will giggle and drool to their utmost delight. Yes, they’ll make a mess, but so would you if you made this, so it really doesn’t matter.

Get your camera. This is a moment to embarrass the kids with twenty years from now at the wedding.


Oreo Truffles

Yield: 3 dozen +, depending on how big your roll the chocolate balls

Ingredients:

  • 1 16-ounce package of Oreo cookies, divided
  • 1 8-ounce package of Philadelphia Cream Cheese, softened
  • 2 8-ounce packages of Baker’s Semi-Sweet Baking Chocolate, melted and stirred to uniformity
  • Sprinkles of your choice, optional

Preparation:

Line a half cookie sheet with wax paper.

Crush 9 of the cookies to fine crumbs in a food processor; reserve for later use. Or cookies can be crushed by putting them in a Ziplock freezer bag, sealing the bag and using a rolling pin. With the pin you can beat or roll. [I was only joking about using a hammer, but you could.]

Crush the remaining 36 cookies to fine crumbs. Place the crumbs in a medium bowl. Add the cream cheese and mix until well blended. There may be little white streaks of cream cheese and the Oreo filling. Streaks are fine, globs are not.

Roll the chocolate mixture into 36-42 round balls, about 1 inch in diameter.

Dip the balls one at a time in the melted chocolate. Use two forks to dip, rotate, and remove each truffle.

Place the truffles on the wax paper covered sheet. Sprinkle with the reserved cookie crumbs or sprinkles as shown in the picture above.

Refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour. Store leftover ruffles, covered, the refrigerator. You can eat them cold or let them first warm a bit to intensify the flavor. If they get to room temperature, they taste just fine, but you will have to lick your fingers.

If kids are involved at room temperature, baths may be necessary and the whole purpose here was to avoid tears. Remember?

Source: allrecipes.com

Photo Information Canon T2i, EFS 60 mm Macro Lens, F/4.5for 1/50th second at ISO‑3200

 

Thousand Island Dressing

1000 Island

 

No, that’s not my usual high definition picture. I don’t happen to have a bottle of Kraft dressing around, actually. Suzen and I live on a make-from-scratch basis. So, the next time we want Thousand Island Dressing, we’ll use the recipe below from Virgil’s Barbecue in Time Square. The Virgil’s team scoured the South for the best recipes in barbecue, sides and condiments.

Funny, I always imagined Thousand Island Dressing being born, not in the South, but somewhere in Polynesia, the ingredients and the techniques ancient and exotic. Like many of you, I grew up with Thousand Island as a staple: on salads, on sandwiches. My goodness, left over roast beef on French bread with Thousand Island? [Or Russian? More on that to come.]

Actually, Thousand Island is not from the South or Polynesia. It’s from the 1000 Island district of the St. Lawrence River between the United States and Canada. Invented by local housewife, it drew attention and publicity in the early 1900’s. It has a base of mayonnaise spiked with chili sauce. As you can see from the recipe, there’s a herd of ingredients that you would not necessarily expect to be pooled together: celery, pimento-stuffed green olives, pickle relish, a hardboiled egg. Just stuff from a farmhouse pantry. Yet when combined, they yield something we can all recognize. The dressing is wonderfully generous in flavor. Just a sniff and you salivate.

It’s true, that some of us confuse Thousand Island with Russian Dressing. Russian Dressing, of course, was created by a chef to the tsars who spent a decade mastering the nuances to …

No, that’s not true. Russian Dressing was invented in Nashua, New Hampshire by James Colburn in the early 1900’s. He’d probably had Thousand Island with its base of mayo and chili sauce. What did Colburn do? He mixed mayo and ketchup. He kept the pimentos and added horseradish.

Important parts of our culinary heritage are thanks to people who just loved to tinker. So, if you are feeling inventive, grab a jar of mayo and then see what is red-colored and on your shelves. I would suggest that you keep the pimento.


Virgil’s Thousand Island Dressing

Yield: 2+ cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 2/3 cups mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup chopped celery
  • 3 tablespoons chili sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chopped pimento-stuffed green olives
  • 1 tablespoon chopped bread and butter pickles
  • 1 teaspoon sweet pickle relish
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 hard-boiled egg, chopped
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cracked black pepper

Preparation:

Combine all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl and mix until completely incorporated. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour prior to serving.

Sources: Virgil’s Road Trip Barbecue Cookbook by Neal Corman with information from Wikipedia